A video from AT&T about the dangers of distracted driving

Text messaging can wait. Learn about the dangers of texting and driving and read wireless safety guides for parents, teens and all drivers.

Click here to view the video…..

Michigan Approves Additionals Restrictions on Graduated Licenses

Teenagers will find tougher restrictions this spring when a law passed at the end of the legislative session goes into effect.

Restrictions on Michigan’s graduated licenses for 16-year-olds will include:

• No driving from 10 p.m. to 5 a.m. unless traveling to and from a place of employment. That’s changed from midnight to 5 a.m.
• Only one passenger age 20 and under, unless accompanied by a parent or an adult over age 21 designated by the parent. There are exceptions for driving to and from school and school events.

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These are good restrictions that will help save lives. Indeed, a Centers for Disease Control analysis released in October found a 38 percent drop in 16- and 17-year-old drivers involved in fatal accidents between 2004 and 2008. The analysis attributed the drop to tougher graduated licensing restrictions passed by the states.

The CDC found 9,644 16- and 17-year-old drivers involved in fatal accidents during that five-year span, causing more than 11,000 deaths. The study recommended that states periodically review their graduated licensing to make adjustments.

Michigan did just that, taking steps to further reduce two of the most dangerous situations for young drivers: inexperience at night driving and difficulty coping with distractions caused by passengers.
The CDC analysis specifically noted that the data don’t indicate improvement in the skills of young drivers as much as tougher laws that are keeping more teen drivers out of dangerous situations.

The Automobile Association of America, which advocated for tougher restrictions, noted that Michigan had been one of only eight states with no restrictions on passengers carried by young drivers, even though it had been among the front runners when adopting graduated licensing in 1997.

Sadly, lawmakers missed a chance to make the roads safer still by banning the use of cell phones in cars. The revisions to the state’s young driver law originally called for a ban on cell phone use, which was dropped before final approval.

Of course, that restriction should not be limited to teens on a graduated license. Research shows that driving while talking on a cell phone is as dangerous as driving while impaired. The Legislature passed a ban on text messaging while driving last year, but failed to ban talking on cell phones while driving. With a new legislative session opening, that’s one bill Michigan could use.

Source: LSJ.com

Cell Phone Use While Driving……

is pervasive, according to reports from teen respondents of the National Young Driver Survey.

1. 80% of teen drivers own a cell phone.

2. Nine out of 10 have witnessed teen drivers talking on a cell phone; seven out of 10 sometimes see emotionally upset teens drive while talking on a cell phone.

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3. 53% have seen teens use another kind of handheld device (text messaging, MP3 player, or game) while driving.

4. 48% reported talking on the phone while driving.

Summer is a Dangerous Time for Teen Drivers

This coming weekend will mark the beginning of summer for many schoolchildren. It also is the start of the most dangerous time of year for young people on the nation’s roads.

States have done just about everything they can to try to improve the traffic safety record among teens; Now it’s up to teens and their families and friends to do even more.

The statistics don’t lie. Drivers age 16 to 20 account for more highway deaths than any other 5-year age group, according to National Highway Traffic Safety Administration data, and the death rate is worst during the summer months — when teens are driving and playing more than during school.

The problem is compounded by the fact that teen drivers and their passengers also are the least likely to use seat belts.

And it doesn’t help that the inexperienced drivers in this age group also are most likely to be distracted — by friends and by cell phones, especially.

Most states require that a 15-year-old who has completed basic driver’s education requirements must then spend 50 hours over the next six months driving with a parent or guardian, 10 of those hours at night.

During this superviser learning program parents can improve their teens new driving experience by identifying the vehicle the teen is driving with a “Rookie Driver” or a “New Driver” magnet. Simple to use, just place the magnet on the car when the teen is driving (along with the parent) and take the magnets off when the parents are driving.

Are You Worried Now That Your Teen Is Driving? “When it comes to ‘New-Driver’ and ‘Student Driver’ car magnets, Rookie Driver products are the Preferred Choice of New Teen Drivers”
CLICK HERE
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With successful completion of that six-month period, young drivers can receive restricted licenses.

As this summer gets into full swing, now is a good time for parents to sit their teenagers down for an important talk about safety and the rules that should accompany the privilege — and it is a privilege, not a right — of newfound four-wheeled freedom.

New Drivers Advice

Teens three times more likely to be in fatal auto accidents.

There have been a number of crashes lately involving teenage drivers. Statistics indicate that teens are involved in three times more fatal auto accidents than other drivers.

The scene always changes and we never know if there is danger around the next curve. It can be tough for experienced drivers and tougher yet on new drivers.

“It takes a driver about five years to become a seasoned driver,” says Bill Mulherin with the Health and Safety Council.

“The newer the driver, the less seasoned they are and the more susceptible they are to not recognizing hazards in time and becoming involved in collisions and this is something that develops over time and develops with practice.”

New drivers have said that it is a big transition going from driving with their parents to driving alone.

They are nervous….they need to make sure they leave enough space in front of them and other drivers and they should drive slow and not speed.

First time drivers say they were terrified the first time they drove on the road. One new driver said she was really scared because her dad took her on a narrow road and it kind of went through woods. It was really scary for her.
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She says the changing scene while driving can be a little intimidating. There are a lot of different distractions when you are driving. I never thought of half of them.

The classes teens can take are great, but nothing can beat experience. A student that has been driving for a year-and-a-half and noticed a big difference in her driving in that short time.

She says she is definitely more of a defensive driver. She makes an observation about what she sees from all directions, not just in front of her. She also checks behind her and to the sides just so she can see what’s going on.

Good advice for young drivers from young drivers.

So how can parents get a little peace of mind when their teen drivers take off in the family vehicle? Mulherin suggests a contract between parents and their teen drivers that helps monitor and reward good driving skills.

The best thing parents can do to properly teach a young driver is to set the tone themselves.

Most of the time they slide into the same errors that their parents have because that’s who they’re modeling, so parents, if you want your kids to drive safer than you, you need to model that behavior when you are in the car with them.

Source: http://www.wowt.com

Help Make Your Teen A Safe Driver

Good parents want their children to be able to tackle all of life’s challenges. Learning to drive is among the most important of those challenges. Parents need to play an active role in the process.

Talk to your teen early and often. Discuss the risks and responsibilities of driving when kids are young – and keep talking to them before, during and after the licensing process to ensure they learn successful, safe driving skills. Give these discussions the same priority as you would discussions about smoking, sex or drugs.

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Don’t rush things. Just because your teen has a permit or license it doesn’t mean they’re ready for every driving condition. Practice with them in empty parking lots or on side streets. Practice at night, in traffic and in adverse weather conditions. Keep in mind that if they do have an accident, it might not be their fault. The fact is, our brains are still developing through the teenage years and don’t reach full maturity until our 20s.

Make sure you’re familiar with your state’s laws (they’ve probably changed since you learned to drive). Many states have enacted laws to help new drivers get on-the-road driving experience under lower-risk conditions, protecting them while they are learning. Know what your state’s requirements are and establish your own rules for when, where, how and with whom your teen may drive.

Practice what you preach. If you speed, roll through stop signs, make rude gestures at other drivers or chat on your cell phone behind the wheel, your teen is likely to do the same.

Source: Allstate.com

Teen Driving Facts

Motor vehicle crashes are the leading cause of death for U.S. teens, accounting for more than one in three deaths in this age group.1 In 2005, twelve teens ages 16 to 19 died every day from motor vehicle injuries.

How big is the problem, and what are the costs?

  • In the United States during 2005, 4,544 teens ages 16 to 19 died of injuries caused by motor vehicle crashes. In the same year, nearly 400,000 motor vehicle occupants in this age group sustained nonfatal injuries that required treatment in an emergency department. Overall, in 2005, teenagers accounted for 10 percent of the U.S. population and 12 percent of motor vehicle crash deaths.
  • Young people ages 15-24 represent only 14% of the U.S. population. However, they account for 30% ($19 billion) of the total costs of motor vehicle injuries among males and 28% ($7 billion) of the total costs of motor vehicle injuries among females.

Who is most at risk?

  • The risk of motor vehicle crashes is higher among 16- to 19-year-olds than among any other age group. In fact, per mile driven, teen drivers ages 16 to 19 are four times more likely than older drivers to crash.
  • Among teen drivers, those at especially high risk for motor vehicle crashes are:
  • Males: In 2005, the motor vehicle death rate for male drivers and passengers ages 16 to 19 was more than one and a half times that of their female counterparts.
  • Teens driving with teen passengers: The presence of teen passengers increases the crash risk of unsupervised teen drivers. This risk increases with the number of teen passengers.
  • Newly licensed teens: Crash risk is particularly high during the first year that teenagers are eligible to drive.

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What are the major risk factors?

  • Teens are more likely than older drivers to underestimate dangerous situations or not be able to recognize hazardous situations.
  • Teens are more likely than older drivers to speed and allow shorter headways (the distance from the front of one vehicle to the front of the next). The presence of male teenage passengers increases the likelihood of this risky driving behavior.
  • Among male drivers between 15 and 20 years of age who were involved in fatal crashes in 2005, 38% were speeding at the time of the crash and 24% had been drinking.
  • Compared with other age groups, teens have the lowest rate of seat belt use. In 2005, 10% of high school students reported they rarely or never wear seat belts when riding with someone else.  In a national survey of seat belt use among high school students:
  • Male high school students (12.5%) were more likely than female students (7.8%) to rarely or never wear seat belts.
  • African-American students (13.4%) and Hispanic students (10.6%) were more likely than white students (9.4%) to rarely or never wear seat belts.
  • At all levels of blood alcohol concentration (BAC), the risk of involvement in a motor vehicle crash is greater for teens than for older drivers.
  • In 2005, 23% of drivers ages 15 to 20 who died in motor vehicle crashes had a BAC of 0.08 g/dl or higher.
  • In a national survey conducted in 2005, nearly three out of ten teens reported that, within the previous month, they had ridden with a driver who had been drinking alcohol. One in ten reported having driven after drinking alcohol within the same one-month period.
  • In 2005, three out of four teen drivers killed in motor vehicle crashes after drinking and driving were not wearing a seat belt.
  • In 2005, half of teen deaths from motor vehicle crashes occurred between 3 p.m. and midnight and 54% occurred on Friday, Saturday, or Sunday.

How can motor vehicle injuries be prevented?

  • There are proven methods to helping teens become safer drivers. Research suggests that the most comprehensive graduated drivers licensing (GDL) programs are associated with reductions of 38% and 40% in fatal and injury crashes, respectively, among 16-year-old drivers.
  • Graduated driver licensing (GDL) systems are designed to delay full licensure while allowing teens to get their initial driving experience under low-risk conditions. For more information about GDL systems, see the Teens Behind the Wheel: Graduated Drivers Licensing fact sheet.
  • When parents know their state’s GDL laws, they can help enforce the laws and, in effect, help keep their teen drivers safe.

Source: http://www.cdc.gov/motorvehiclesafety/teen_drivers/teendrivers_factsheet.html

Rookie Driver Brand New Driver Signs | New Driver Magnets Granted Trademarks

RookieDriver.Net, a leading online provider of teen driving safety products recently acquired federal trademarks for their new driver signs and new driver magnets symbol which are placed on cars as a safety precaution.

Since 2006, the ‘branded’ symbol has helped identify new drivers when they begin driving with their parents on a learners permit. The new driver signs are now registered with the United States Patent and Trademark Office, nationally designated to help alert other drivers in all 50 states that there is a new teen driver behind the wheel of a car with their parents.

The new driver symbol was created to increase awareness towards inexperienced drivers and it is the first standardized national symbol to recognize new drivers. The new driver car magnets provide a national ‘branded’ solution to identifying a new driver’s vehicle and this allows experienced drivers in every state to quickly identify the symbol and anticipate common new driver mistakes.

The new driver signs were created in 2006 by a mother, Corinne Fortenbacher, and her 15 year-old son Austin in an effort to help reduce accidents and to bring national attention to the issue of teen driving safety, the leading cause of death for young people in the U.S.

Most states have implemented longer graduated drivers license programs that allow more time for parents to drive with their children during the learners permit phase. Supervised parent involvement with extended learning time proves to reduce exposure to high-risk situations, according to safety experts.

Until now, one of the most overlooked components in improving new teen driver safety has been identifying their cars with nationally standardized New Driver signs. Inexperience is the leading cause of teen driving accidents. By increasing awareness of new drivers, parents can help minimize traffic related deaths and injuries.

Best Student Driver Signs | Student Driver Magnets Don’t Use the Word Student…Find out why??

RookieDriver.Net, a leading online provider of teen driving safety information, has been granted registered trademarks for the company’s ‘Rookie Driver’ and ‘Rookie Driver In Training’ auto magnets, for use as nationally recognized symbols to alert OTHER drivers that inexperienced new teen drivers are driving with their parents on a learners permit.

Created in 2006 by Corinne Fortenbacher and her 15 year-old son Austin, the unique car magnet symbols are the only new driver alert products to be granted federally registered trademarks for this category. They’re bringing national media attention to the issue of teen driving safety because more needs to be done to prevent teen crashes, the leading cause of death for young people in the U.S.

Fortenbacher cautions that many parents use student driver signs or student driver magnets on their cars, AFTER their teen has completed drivers training, while driving with their new teen drivers on their learners permit. This can give other drivers a false sense of security by assuming the ‘student driver’ is accompanied by a certified student driver teacher in a dual-brake vehicle.

Fortenbacher says the “Branded” rookie driver symbols have the potential to dramatically increase awareness towards inexperienced drivers, while driving with their parents on their learners permit, because they are the first standardized national symbols to recognize new drivers, while driving with their parents. The symbols are in use in all 50 states.

Fortenbacher says that inexperience is the leading cause of teen driving accidents. One of the most overlooked components in improving safety is simply identifying the new driver’s car with a standardized magnetic symbol that alerts other drivers that there is a novice driver behind the wheel. This allows experienced drivers to anticipate common new driver mistakes.

We’re entering the ‘danger season’ for teenage drivers

This past weekend marked the beginning of summer for many schoolchildren. It also is the start of the most dangerous time of year for young people on the nation’s roads.

States have done just about everything they can to try to improve the traffic safety record among teens; Now it’s up to teens and their families and friends to do even more.

The statistics don’t lie. Drivers age 16 to 20 account for more highway deaths than any other 5-year age group, according to National Highway Traffic Safety Administration data, and the death rate is worst during the summer months — when teens are driving and playing more than during school.

The problem is compounded by the fact that teen drivers and their passengers also are the least likely to use seat belts.

And it doesn’t help that the inexperienced drivers in this age group also are most likely to be distracted — by friends and by cell phones, especially.

Most states require that a 15-year-old who has completed basic driver’s education requirements must then spend 50 hours over the next six months driving with a parent or guardian, 10 of those hours at night.

During this superviser learning program parents can improve their teens new driving experience by identifying the vehicle the teen is driving with a “Rookie Driver” or a “New Driver” magnet. Simple to use, just place the magnet on the car when the teen is driving (along with the parent) and take the magnets off when the parents are driving.

Are You Worried Now That Your Teen Is Driving? “When it comes to ‘New-Driver’ and ‘Student Driver’ car magnets, Rookie Driver products are the Preferred Choice of New Teen Drivers”
CLICK HERE
to see.

With successful completion of that six-month period, young drivers can receive restricted licenses.

As this summer gets into full swing, it would be a good time for parents to sit their teenagers down for an important talk about safety and the rules that should accompany the privilege — and it is a privilege, not a right — of newfound four-wheeled freedom.