Summer is a Dangerous Time for Teen Drivers

This coming weekend will mark the beginning of summer for many schoolchildren. It also is the start of the most dangerous time of year for young people on the nation’s roads.

States have done just about everything they can to try to improve the traffic safety record among teens; Now it’s up to teens and their families and friends to do even more.

The statistics don’t lie. Drivers age 16 to 20 account for more highway deaths than any other 5-year age group, according to National Highway Traffic Safety Administration data, and the death rate is worst during the summer months — when teens are driving and playing more than during school.

The problem is compounded by the fact that teen drivers and their passengers also are the least likely to use seat belts.

And it doesn’t help that the inexperienced drivers in this age group also are most likely to be distracted — by friends and by cell phones, especially.

Most states require that a 15-year-old who has completed basic driver’s education requirements must then spend 50 hours over the next six months driving with a parent or guardian, 10 of those hours at night.

During this superviser learning program parents can improve their teens new driving experience by identifying the vehicle the teen is driving with a “Rookie Driver” or a “New Driver” magnet. Simple to use, just place the magnet on the car when the teen is driving (along with the parent) and take the magnets off when the parents are driving.

Are You Worried Now That Your Teen Is Driving? “When it comes to ‘New-Driver’ and ‘Student Driver’ car magnets, Rookie Driver products are the Preferred Choice of New Teen Drivers”
CLICK HERE
to see.

With successful completion of that six-month period, young drivers can receive restricted licenses.

As this summer gets into full swing, now is a good time for parents to sit their teenagers down for an important talk about safety and the rules that should accompany the privilege — and it is a privilege, not a right — of newfound four-wheeled freedom.

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Winter Driving Techniques Part 3 – Steering In Bad Weather

Snowy or icy surfaces make steering difficult and require smooth, careful, precise movements of the steering wheel. Skidding in which the front or rear moves laterally is caused by hard acceleration or braking, speeds too fast for conditions, and quick jerky movements of the steering wheel.

You may need to take evasive action to avoid a collision. Steering is preferred to braking at speeds above 25 mph because less distance is required to steer around an object than to brake to a stop. In slick conditions, sudden braking can lead to loss of control.

Are You Worried Now That Your Teen Is Driving? “When it comes to ‘New-Driver’ and ‘Student Driver’ car magnets, Rookie Driver products are the Preferred Choice of New Teen Drivers”

CLICK HERE
to see.

Emergency steering methods:

1. The push-pull-slide method of steering is performed by shuffling your hands so that neither hand crosses over the imaginary line between 12 and 6 o’clock. Since the arms never cross, you are able to provide continuous adjustments in either direction.

2. The fixed-hand steering method allows rapid 180-degree steering to either direction, but it has one
shortcoming. This method is confining in that your arms may get locked together as you attempt to steer past 180 degrees, leaving you in an awkward position to make further fine adjustments.

Source: http://www.aaapublicaffairs.com

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