Hi-Tech Keychain Monitors Teen Driving Habits

SPRING LAKE, Michigan, August 19, 2008 – A high tech company has developed a new innovative electronic key chain LCD device that enables parents to monitor how their teens or family car is being driven. RookieDriver.Net, a leading online provider of teen driver safety products, markets the Lemur Autovision created by Root Four Imagination.
 
Speed, inexperience and distraction are key risk factors in most teen accidents. From the moment a teen backs out of the driveway, the Lemur Autovision electronic keychain is capturing driving data.  

 

The on-board sensor records maximum speed, total distance, and any excessive braking. The keychain LCD displays this data in an easy-to-read format.

When a teen returns the keys, parents can immediately review how safely their son or daughter is driving.  No need to download data to a personal computer. It’s all there, in the palm of their hand. 

Corinne Fortenbacher, the president of Rookie Driver.Net, has just begun marketing the Lemur Autovision on their website and sees the product as a great new tool to help parents improve safety for their teen drivers. 

“A quick review of the data collected by the keychain with their teen driver provides parents an opportunity to positively reinforce good driving habits, or take appropriate action to modify poorer ones,” Fortenbacher said.  “And, it gives teens an opportunity to show they are responsible drivers.”


“The main focus is that the teenager is aware – that their parents will be aware; therefore they won’t drive recklessly in the first place, because they want the car next weekend,” said Maurice Tuff, the president of Root Four Imagination.  “It is a preventative device, not a catch-you, tattle-tale device.”


“In terms of trust, yeah, we’ve been asked that question a lot,” Tuff added.  “We’ve got to go beyond trust.  We’ve got to go to safety; we have to save our children.  Parents don’t consider reviewing a teen’s school report card as spying, or a breach of the parent teen trust relationship, so why worry about a device that reports on their driving performance?   The consequences of poor driving habits can be fatal by comparison.”


Tuff noted that there are similar products on the market that are much more invasive.  “It’s not a GPS,” he said.  “It just gives a few pieces of vital information to parents.”

 

The Lemur Autovision is simple to install and offers parents the advantage of “real-time” information on their teen’s driving habits.  It is also tamper proof and PIN protected.  It’s affordable, at under $100, and there are no monthly fees, as with most GPS products on the market.   For more information, go to www.RookieDriver.Net.

Contacts:
Corinne Fortenbacher, President
RookieDriver.Net
888-285-7875
Email:
Corinne@RookieDriver.Net
Web: www.RookieDriver.Net

 

Maurice Tuff, President

Root Four Imagination Inc.

709-747-7593

mtuff@rootfour.com

 

Or, visit RookieDriver.Net’s Media Room at:
http://www.rookiedriverintraining.com/rookiedriver-news.html

 

Visit their teen driving safety blog at:  https://rookiedriver.wordpress.com/

About Rookie Driver.Net

RookieDriver.Net develops and markets a line of car magnets to alert experienced drivers that there is a novice driver behind the wheel.  Rookie Driver® is the only symbol awarded a registered trademark by the US Patent and Trademark Office to nationally recognize new teen drivers.  The firm has grown from a single product, launched in 2006, to a leading online provider of new driver safety aids.  RookieDriver.Net’s products are designed by teens and can be found at http://www.RookieDriver.Net.

 

 

 

 

 

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